Tag Archives: History

Book: Annexation and the Unhappy Valley by Matthew Cook

Matthew A. Cook, Annexation and the Unhappy Valley, The Historical Anthropology of Sindh’s Colonization. Leiden: Brill, 2016.

“Annexation and the Unhappy Valley: The Historical Anthropology of Sindh’s Colonization addresses the nineteenth century expansion and consolidation of British colonial power in the Sindh region of South Asia. It adopts an interdisciplinary approach and employs a fine-grained, nuanced and situated reading of multiple agents and their actions. It explores how the political and administrative Continue reading Book: Annexation and the Unhappy Valley by Matthew Cook

Book: Karachi. The Land Issue by Arif Hasan, Noman Ahmed, Mansoor Raza et al

Arif Hasan, Noman Ahmed, Mansoor Raza, Asiya Sadiq-Polack,  Saeed Uddin Ahmed, and Moizza B. Sarwar, Karachi: The Land Issue, Karachi: Oxford University Press, 2015.

“Karachi is one of the fastest growing cities in the world. It is Pakistan’s only port and the major contributor to the country’s economy. In addition, it is also a diverse city with its population politically divided along ethnic lines. These three factors make the urban land and that on the city’s fringe a highly contested commodity: federal, provincial, and local land-owning agencies, corporate sector interests, formal and Continue reading Book: Karachi. The Land Issue by Arif Hasan, Noman Ahmed, Mansoor Raza et al

Book: Historical Dictionary of the Sufi Culture of Sindh in Pakistan and India by Michel Boivin

Michel Boivin, Historical Dictionary of the Sufi Culture of Sindh in Pakistan and India, Karachi: Oxford University Press, 2015.

Michel Boivin is currently Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for South Asian Studies, CNRS-EHESS, in Paris.

“This book tackles the issue of delimiting Sufism: where does it start and where does it end? Speaking about Sufism does not typically account for its wide range of influence on societies and cultures. Thus this Dictionary aims to highlight the extent of Sufism’s reach, specifically in the context of Sindh. Various forms and Continue reading Book: Historical Dictionary of the Sufi Culture of Sindh in Pakistan and India by Michel Boivin

Book: The Pakistan Paradox: Instability and Resilience by Christophe Jaffrelot

Jaffrelot, C., 2014, The Pakistan Paradox: Instability and Resilience, Hurst Publishers.

Dr Christophe Jaffrelot is Research Director at CNRS and teaches South Asian politics and history at Sciences Po (Paris).

“Pakistan was born as the creation of elite Urdu-speaking Muslims who sought to govern a state that would maintain their dominance. After rallying non-Urdu speaking leaders around him, Jinnah imposed a unitary definition of the new nation state that obliterated linguistic diversity. This centralisation — ‘justified’ by the Indian threat — fostered centrifugal forces that resulted in Bengali secessionism in 1971 and Baloch, as well as Mohajir, separatisms today. Continue reading Book: The Pakistan Paradox: Instability and Resilience by Christophe Jaffrelot

Balochistan Archives now online

“The Balochistan Archives has an impressive collection of the official records, rare books, and rare photographs of the British period. The Directorate has catalogued 27,000 files for research purposes in addition to 29,000 files of defunct Commissioners’ Office. Our collections include the Agent to the Governor General (AGG) Balochistan’s Records (1831-1947), Revenue Commissioner’s Records (1855-1955), Chief Commissioner’s Records (1910-1937), and Balochistan Secretariat Records (1903-1954).” Continue reading Balochistan Archives now online

Call for papers: “Sindh through the centuries”, December 2013

Second International Seminar on

“Sindh through the centuries”

Karachi, December 2013

“Sindh Madressatul Islam University is organizing Second International Seminar on “Sindh Through the Centuries” at Karachi in December 2013. The seminar will focus on history, culture, language, archeology, anthropology, cuisine, arts and crafts of Sindh, which has the distinction of being the seat of the ancient Indus Valley Civilization. Continue reading Call for papers: “Sindh through the centuries”, December 2013

International conference: Exploring modern South Asian history with visual research methods

Call for papers

‘Exploring modern South Asian history with visual research methods: theories and practices’ Conference

University of Cambridge, 15 – 16 March 2013

CFP deadline: 31 December 2012

Conveners: Dr Annamaria Motrescu (University of Cambridge) and Prof. Marcus Banks (University of Oxford)

Full details at http://www.crassh.cam.ac.uk/events/2066/ Continue reading International conference: Exploring modern South Asian history with visual research methods

Book: A Modern History of the Ismailis

Farhad Daftary, A Modern History of the Ismailis: Continuity and Change in a Muslim Community, London, I.B. Tauris Publishers, 2011.

“The Ismailis have enjoyed a long, eventful and complex history dating back to the 8th century CE and originating in the Shi’i tradition of Islam. During the medieval period, Ismailis of different regions – especially in central Asia, south Asia, Iran and Syria – developed and elaborated their own distinctive literary and intellectual traditions, which have made an outstanding contribution to the culture of Islam as a whole. At the same time, the Ismailis in the Middle Ages split into two main groups who followed different spiritual leaders. The bulk of the Ismailis came to have a line of imams now represented by the Aga Khans, while a smaller group – known in south Asia as the Bohras – developed their own type of leadership.This collection is the first scholarly attempt to survey the modern history of both Ismaili groupings since the middle of the 19th century. It covers a variety of topical issues and themes, such as the modernising policies of the Aga Khans, and also includes original studies of regional developments in Ismaili communities worldwide. The contributors focus too on how the Ismailis as a religious community have responded to the twin challenges of modernity and emigration to the West. ‘A Modern History of the Ismailis’ will be welcomed as the most complete assessment yet published of the recent trajectory of this fascinating and influential Shi’i community.”

The introduction can be downloaded on the website of the Institute of Ismaili Studies. The table contents and the entire bibliography of the book can also be consulted from there.

“Farhad Daftary is Associate Director and Head of the Department of Academic Research and Publications at the Institute of Ismaili Studies in London. An international authority on Ismaili studies, his many acclaimed books in the field include The Ismailis: Their History and Doctrines, The Assassin Legends: Myths of the Ismailis, and A Short History of the Ismailis.”