Three panjrâs of Udero Lâl, translated by Charu P. Gidwani

Uderolal and the panjrâs

 

 

A representation of Uderolal on a booklet

 

 

 

Uderolâl, also known as Jhulelal, is God to some Sindhi-Hindu believers. Legend has it that Uderolâl was born as saviour of the people of Thatta in Sindh. The people here felt helpless when faced with the atrocities of the Muslim ruler Mirkshah who forced them to follow Islam. They offered prayers at the banks of river Sindhu (Indus). Uderolâl was an answer to their prayers. For the Sindhi-Hindus in India, He has become an important mark of identity; especially because they were forced to leave Sindh due to the Partition of India. Sindh is now in Pakistan. Jhulelal offers a distinct mark of identity to the community in India.

The panjrâs of Jhulelal are prayers sung to the glory of Jhulelal. It is the panjrâs that add to the liveliness of the bairanas, a festive occasion to offer prayers and thanksgiving to Jhulelal. The crowd gathered for the occasion, colourfully dressed, sing loudly the panjrâs to the beat of musical instruments. Of these the dhol, a kind of drum, is the most important. Another important instrument is the earthen pot, which is turned upside down and tapped rhythmically. Devotees accompany the music with their claps. As the force of the music and singing catches on devotees also start dancing.

About the translator

Charu P. Gidwani holds a PhD from Pune University, May 2004, Depiction of Childhood in the Works of Rabindranath Tagore. She is the daughter of a Sindhi linguist and lexicographer, Dr Parso J. Gidwani. She has inherited her love for Sindh and Sindhi from him. She teaches English Literature at RKT College, affiliated to the Mumbai University.

1. O my Jhulelal Sain

Mounted on a blue* horse, my Lal Sain
Riding a pallo* fish, my Lal Sain
Makes every Sindhi prosper, my Lal Sain
Makes us carry offerings* every year, my Lal Sain
Makes us keep bairanas*, fulfils all our wishes, my
Lal Sain
He is the true glory of Sindhunagar*, my Lal Sain
Ferries* everyone across, my Lal Sain
Fulfils hopes of devotees, my Lal Sain
At your feet, all bow their heads,
My Lal Sain, O my Lal Sain

Source: Anonymous panjra, Jhulelal Ji Mahima, second edition, April 2008, edited by Kavi Bharat (Bhagat) Bhatya, p. 14.

Glossary

blue: blue colour is the colour of gods, it represents divinity in the Hindu religion.

pallo: a kind of a fish that belongs to the clupa ilisha genre. Legend has it that Jhulelal, referred here as ‘Lal Sain’, had this fish for his vehicle. A special feature of this fish is that it swims against the current.

offerings: offerings to Jhulelal are made in pots, these are then immersed in a river or flowing water, after the bairana is
over.

bairana: it is an occasion to worship, offer prays, offer thanks to Jhulelal. One of the most important times of bairana is conducted is on Cheti Chand, the time, in March, marking the birth of Jhulelal. This is also the Sindhi New
Year.

Sindhunagar: This is the proposed name for Ulhasnagar, a place of British horse-stables converted to a camp for Sindhi
refugees. Literally, ‘Sindhunagar’ means ‘settlement of Sindhis’.

ferries everyone across: in Hinduism very often life is compared to an ocean. Faith in God, and God alone, can carry a human being safely across this ocean of life. To put it simply, faith in God makes life smooth.

2. O Lal keep my honour safe Jhulelan

This anonymous panjrâ is a favourite of Sufi singers in and around Sindh. Famous Sufi singers in Sindh, Punjab and  even Bangladesh have sung it.

Lal keep my honour safe* Jhulelalan*,
O thou of Sindhdi*, of Sewan*, of Sakhar*,
Hail Mast Qalandar*, we’ve Dulhe* in our hearts
Four lamps always burn at your shrine,
The fifth one I have come to light O Jhulelalan,
O thou of Sindhdi, of Sewan, of Sakhar…
You bless mothers with children,
You safeguard fortunes of young girls*,
O thou of Sindhdi, of Sewan, of Sakhar…
All who have lit the flame of Dulhe,
You fill their coffers Jhulelalan,
O thou of Sindhdi, of Sewan, of Sakhar…
O Peer* of Peers come to the centre of the ocean,
In the name of the Lord ferry my boat across
Jhulelalan,
O thou of Sindhdi, of Sewan, of Sakhar…

Sources: Jai Jhulelal Beda I Paar (Collection of stories, songs, prayers of Jhulelal), Ahemadabad; Ke Saahitun Sajanan Saan: Sain Dr Rochaldas Sahibun Ji Satsangi Rihaan (Some Conversations with Dr Rochaldas), by Shri H.M. Damodar, 1991.

Glossary

 

A representation of Jhulelal

 

 

‘Keep my honour safe’: is reference to the fact that the devotee has surrendered to God. Here the devotee pleads with God to keep his name, respect, dignity in society intact. That is all what the devotee seeks of God in humility.

Jhulelalan: the ‘an’ ending is the suffix used to show endearment.

Sindhdi: the ‘di’ suffix is one showing endearment. Literally, Sindhdi, means Sindh. Sewan, Sakhar: places in Sindh. Mast Qalandar: refers to Qalandar Lal Shahbaaz, a peer. History gives different versions of him. According to Dr Rochaldas, a well-known saint from Sindh, Shahbaaz Qalandar even met Jhulelal. Shahbaaz Qalandar, fond of excursions, breathed his last at Sehwan, where a shrine is built in his name. Because his name as well as Jhulelal’s name has ‘Lal’, today, many consider both names referring to one person. This song is a fine example of how the Sindhi mind is not rigidly fanatic about one religion. Here Jhulelal -a Hindu God- is seen as one with Mast Qalandar -a Muslim Peer.

Dulhe: another name of Jhulelal.

You safeguard fortunes of young girls: this is a subtle way of praying to Jhulelal that he bless young girls with good husbands. A girl’s getting married to a worthy boy was seen as all that was needed for her well-being. This concept of a girl’s good life has not changed much even today.

Peer: a peer is believed to be close to the Almighty. Peers are known to have shown miracles to save their followers from trouble. There have been many peers in Sindh. It is not unusual to hear of Sindhi Hindu families in India also knowing and believing a peer. Even today festivities are held related to one peer or the other which are attended in huge numbers by both Hindus and Muslims. Singing of folk devotional songs throughout the night are a special feature of these fairs. These fairs are held in Sindh (Pakistan) and also in Kutch (India) even today.

3. Panjrâ by Ram Panjwani

Ram Panjwani was a Sindhi writer (1911-1987). He has written many plays, novels, essays mainly on social issues. His most important contribution to the Sindhi community lies in the fact that he reintroduced Uderolâl to Sindhi-Hindus in India, especially in Ulhasnagar, after the Partition.

Jhule Jhule Jhule Jhulelal
Lal Sain Uderolal
We, humble, full of vices,
Dulaah*, at your door sell ourselves*
Our state is not hidden from you
Please keep us well
Satguru* Sain* you fulfil our hopes
Babal* Sain you ferry us across the ocean of life
I am naked*, O pall-giver*
Saviour of the helpless
Jhule Jhule Jhule Jhulelal Sain

Source: Bharatiya Sindhu Sabha, Mumbai, Volume VI, Oct-Nov 2000, “Sindhi of the Millenium: Bhagat Kanwar Ram”, Editor and Publisher: Mohan Motwani, 5, Sai Parsad, Shivaji Park, Mumbai 400028.

Glossary

Dulaah: a term for Jhulelal.

sell-ourselves: the idea here is that the devotee is worth nothing at the doorstep of God.

Satguru: ‘guru’ refers to teacher. ‘Sat’ refers to truth or the ultimate reality. Satguru here refers to Jhulelal.

Babal: endearing form of Baba. Baba is a term of reverence used to address any old man. Grandchildren usually address their grandfather as Baba.

Sain: term of address showing respect.

‘I am naked’: this line suggests complete surrender of the devotee to God. The devotee has nothing to hide from God. Pall-giver: God as giving the protective cover of the pall, covering the devotee’s nakedness to protect his honour.


One thought on “Three panjrâs of Udero Lâl, translated by Charu P. Gidwani”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *